I just watched “The Normal Heart” on HBO and it is a must-see. I was looking through On Demand for something to watch and decided on that just because I saw that Mark Ruffalo is in it (he’s a native of Kenosha, WI where I spent a good chunk of my life and he’s one of my favorite actors)- I didn’t know much about the film. It’s about a group of gay activists trying to raise awareness about the AIDS/HIV epidemic and takes place in the early 80s.

Soon I realized this was the movie that Julia Roberts plays a doctor/researcher in (I happened to see a clip of her in it when I caught some of the Emmy’s last week). She is excellent in it, this is one of Mark Ruffalo’s most brilliant pieces, and the whole cast is amazing. It’s one of the most gut-wrenching stories I’ve seen in awhile, and these actors tell it so well. It’s educational, it’s heartbreaking, it’s infuriating, it’s inspiring. Go watch it.

The struggle continues… 

iguessthatscool

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

micdotcom

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

"People of color, black people especially, cannot and should not shoulder the burden for dismantling the racist, white supremacist system that devalues and criminalizes black life without the all in support, blood, sweat and tears of white people. If you are not already a white ally, now is the time to become one."